From the start

Smiling woman holds smartphone displaying Informed Delivery screen

The Postal Service’s newest employees in Pacific Area are learning about the importance of Informed Delivery as soon as they begin their USPS careers.

The area’s Informed Delivery ambassadors are visiting orientation classes for new hires to tell them about the mail notification service and its importance to the organization’s future.

“Informed Delivery is a vital component of the Postal Service’s efforts to add value to the mail and grow revenue,” said Judi Mummy, a customer service program analyst and lead ambassador for Pacific Area. “It’s important that new employees understand how Informed Delivery makes mail more relevant to consumers.”

Informed Delivery is a free feature that allows users to digitally preview their incoming mail and manage their packages from computers, tablets and mobile devices.

Businesses can add interactive content to the Informed Delivery emails that consumers receive, making it a potentially significant revenue source.

To grow Informed Delivery, which currently has more than 12 million users, USPS has introduced Inform 5, a campaign to encourage employees to tell at least five employees each day about the feature.

The organization has also recruited ambassadors like Mummy to spread the word about the advantages of using Informed Delivery.

USPS is encouraging other areas to follow Pacific’s approach and ensure new hires understand the importance of promoting Informed Delivery. Pacific is a national leader in signing up consumers for the feature.

Samantha Higgins, a newly hired city carrier assistant in the San Diego area, appreciated learning about Informed Delivery during her orientation. She even enrolled in the feature herself.

“I will use it a lot because it’s a good way to keep track and keep organized,” Higgins said. “If customers have any questions about their mail or packages, I’ll let them know Informed Delivery can help them.”

Where do you live?

Mail in slots inside postal workroom

The Postal Service requires all employees to provide a current mailing address. If you need to update your information, five methods are available:

• LiteBlue. Use any computer to go to liteblue.usps.gov and enter your employee identification number and password. Select the “Change of Address” option in the rotating carousel in the center of the page. Select “edit” to make changes.

• Blue. Use a postal computer to go to blue.usps.gov, select “Log On” near the upper right-hand corner of the page and enter your ACE identification and password. Select the “My Life” tab. Under the “My Profile” heading, select “Address/Phone” and make changes.

• Employee kiosks. If your facility has an employee self-service kiosk, go to the main page and select the “Present Job Info/Change of Address” tab to make edits.

• Telephone. Call the Human Resources Shared Service Center (HRSSC) at 877-477-3273 and select option 5. Before you can make edits, you’ll need to validate your identity with your employee identification number and USPS personal identification number.

• Mail. Send PS Form 1216, Employee’s Current Mailing Address, to: HRSSC, Benefits/Compensation, PO Box 970400, Greensboro, NC 27497-0400.

The Accounting Blue page has additional information on changing your mailing address and other important topics.

Need to know

Composite group shots of people smiling and displaying certificates

FOIA awards. The Postal Service recently honored two individuals for their efforts to respond to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests.

Marthea Hodge, a purchasing and supply management policy specialist, and Mary-Lynne Bratton, a mail and package information technology contractor, received the recognition.

Hodge and Bratton work at USPS headquarters in Washington DC.

They each received Chief FOIA Officer’s Awards, a quarterly program that recognizes postal workers who respond to requests in a timely manner and help USPS foster transparency.

Kudos for Santa. The Postal Service’s Operation Santa initiative was honored last week with an International ECHO Award for best data-inspired campaign.

The marketing firm behind the campaign, MRM McCann, received the gold award in ECHO’s social good category, which recognizes campaigns that have a positive effect on people’s lives.

Operation Santa was also a finalist in ECHO’s consumer products and services category.

The ECHO Awards, organized by the Data & Marketing Association, honor data-driven marketing campaigns around the world.

Get Informed. The latest USPS blog post reminds customers that using Informed Delivery can help make holiday mailing and shipping more convenient.

The blog notes that the free feature allows users to preview greeting cards and other mail while on holiday travel and respond to loved ones before returning home.

From October-December, the Postal Posts blog will offer packaging tips, mail-by dates, holiday hours and other information to help customers meet their holiday mailing and shipping needs.

Got news for “Need to know”? Email your submissions to uspslink@usps.gov.

News quiz

Man wearing suit is interviewed by TV news crew near Christmas tree

Here’s Link’s latest “News quiz,” a weekly feature that invites readers to test their knowledge of recent stories. The correct answers appear at the end.

1. True or false: More than 301,000 USPS employees receive an annual allowance to purchase uniforms from authorized providers.

a) True
b) False

2. Fill in the blank: USPS recently updated (blank), a tool that allows customers to go online to schedule passport application appointments.

a) Informed Delivery
b) Internal Service Performance Measurement
c) Link mobile
d) Retail Customer Appointment Scheduler

3. Where does Letter Carrier Chris Hubble deliver mail and packages by bicycle?

a) Miami Beach, FL
b) St. Petersburg, FL
c) Sun City, AZ
d) Tampa, FL

4. Who painted the images featured on the new Sparkling Holidays stamps?

a) Hamilton King
b) Norman Rockwell
c) Frederic Stanley
d) Haddon Sundblom

5. If placed end to end, all Hot Wheels cars produced since 1968 would circle Earth how many times?

a) More than 40
b) More than 400
c) More than 4,000
d) More than 40,000

Answers: 1) a. 2) d. 3) b. 4) d. 5) a.

Look for a new quiz next week and share your feedback with Link at uspslink@usps.gov.